TYCT Newsletter September 2017

This newsletter gives you an update on what is happening – and happening fast – and will affect you.


 

For all providers on the Treatments You Can Trust Register

 

JCCP Stakeholder Event : Launch of the new Stakeholder Council 20th September 2017

jccp logowww.jccp.org.uk

13:00 – 15:00
Chandos House, 2 Queen Anne St, Marylebone, London W1G 9LQ

Please email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to indicate your intention to attend and receive documents.

 

New European Aesthetic Non-Surgical Standard Published

August 2017: A new European Standard on non-surgical aesthetics has now been published.

The Standard covers a vast range of treatments, including:

  • Chemical peels
  • Botulinum toxin injections
  • Fillers
  • Micro needling
  • Laser & IPL
  • Ultrasound
  • Cryolipolysis
  • ... and many more.

The full title of the Standard is: Aesthetic medicine services - Non surgical medical treatments EN 16844.

The topics covered are:

  • Competencies
  • Management and communication with patients
  • Facilities
  • Treatments
  • Code of Ethics for marketing and advertising.

To obtain a copy of the Standard go to shop.bsigroup.com and search on the Document Number i.e. 16844

TYCT has taken a full part in the negotiations over the last 5 years leading to this significant advance in public safety.

 

Dermal Fillers - New medical device regulations launched

For the first time Dermal Fillers will be regulated as medical devices.  This is under the new EU regulations for medical devices (MDR). Implementation of the 3 year transition period is underway to complete by 26 May 2020.  The UK post-Brexit will continue to comply.

The new regulations include clearer obligations for those involved in manufacturing and supplying devices, a greater emphasis on traceability throughout the whole supply chain with the introduction of a unique device identification (UDI) system and new standards for clinical evidence.

MDR lists categories of products similar to medical devices that do not have any medical benefit and are used for other purposes, such as dermal fillers, non-corrective contact lenses and brain stimulation devices. These products carry much of the same risks as medical devices and – under these new Regulations and detailed ‘Common specifications’ to be published by the European Commission – their manufacturers, importers and distributors will be regulated in the same way.

 

Introductory Guide introduced for product manufacturers.

The Introductory Guide, designed as an interactive pdf, will help new manufacturers who may be looking at the regulations for the first time, and will also help experienced manufacturers navigate the changes in the new regulations.  MHRA is sharing the link to the guide via social media channels.

 

Advance in patient safety welcomed

TYCT has been calling for this change for many years, and believes practitioners on the TYCT Register will welcome this advance towards greater public safety.  See also the paragraph below Problems facing the non-surgical cosmetic sector 

mhra logo webThese sites offer more information:

 

British Medical Journal (BMJ) Survey suggests 83% think dermal filler should be a POM

18 JUL 2017

An overwhelming majority of participants in a recent survey conducted by The British Medical Journal (BMJ) believe that dermal filler treatments should only be available with prescription.

There were 1,054 votes cast in the online poll and, of these BMJ website users, 877 voted ‘yes’ for dermal fillers to be a prescription only medication (POM).

Independent nurse prescriber and chair of the BACN Sharon Bennett said she wasn’t surprised by the results of this survey, but added “I have mixed views about dermal fillers being either prescription medicines or devices, as I don’t think making them POMs will solve all of our concerns. I think it would be better to have definitive limitations put in place on who can administer them."

She continued, "I see many cases of poor treatment delivery, even from the medical fraternity, and being able to write a prescription for a drug or a device is not the ticket to ensuring a safe treatment or good outcome.”

 

Problems facing the non-surgical cosmetic sector

An illuminating press report about allegations of bad practice in the use of dermal fillers by an unqualified person illustrates many of the public safety issues faced by the non-surgical cosmetic sector. 

 

Clinical and Practice Standards For Non-Surgical Cosmetic Procedures – Consultation by the CPSA

Practitioners asked to Reply to consultation from The Cosmetic Practice Standards Authority (CPSA) by 11th October

The Cosmetic Practice Standards Authority (CPSA) has held workshops for the clinical and practice standards for non-surgical cosmetic procedures (dermal fillers, toxins, skin rejuvenation and lasers) and hair restoration surgery.

The CPSA has engaged with professionals from across the aesthetics sector. The workshops included nominees from:

  • British Association of Dermatologists (BAD)
  • British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons (BAPRAS)
  • British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons (BAAPS)
  • British Association of Cosmetic Nurses (BACN)
  • British College of Aesthetic Medicine (BCAM)
  • British Association of Hair Restoration Surgery (BAHRS)
  • British Medical Laser Association (BMLA)
  • Aesthetic Practitioner Working Group (APWG) led by Habia.

The standards are currently being drafted and will go out to consultation from September 11 to 8 October.

 

Ensure quality in the life cycle of medical devices 

Medical devices are vital to the delivery of healthcare services, and so they require a high level of safety, performance and reliability.

iso 13485 2016BS EN ISO 13485:2016 gives confidence to consumers and health professionals by guiding organizations to improve and demonstrate best practices in quality. 

By providing requirements for the design and development process of medical devices, ISO 13485:2016 helps manufacturers to oversee the safety and performance of medical devices.

 

For Doctors

 

Are you a teacher or a mentor for non-surgical cosmetic practitioners?

 

Teach the Teacher

A new two day highly interactive and practical course has been designed and will be delivered by Dr Nessa Carey, Career Scientist and Educationalist, and Miss Kaji Sritharan, Associate Dean, Royal Society of Medicine. 

The course will empower clinician teachers with the knowledge, confidence and skills to teach effectively in a wide range of settings. Teaching methods used in this course will include mircoteaching delivered by the delegates; short interactive presentations; role plays and group work.

Objectives

  • Identify appropriate teaching methods based on setting and desired outcome
  • Understand how adults learn and use this to improve teaching skills
  • Structure teaching sessions to maximise effectiveness
  • Reflect on performance

Course dates

  • Thursday 5 - Friday 6 October 2017
  • Thursday 1 - Friday 2 February 2018
  • Thursday 26 - Friday 27 April 2018
  • Thursday 14 - Friday 15 June 2018

Venue: Chandos House, 2 Queen Anne Street, London, W1G 9LQ
Rates: Royal Society of Medicine members: £475
Rates: Non-RSM Members: £575
Contact: Gemma Lamb +44(0)20 7290 3946
Contact: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Good Medical Practice

The Professional Standards Authority publishes your name to the public www.checkapractitioner.com

The authority asks us to bring the following to your attention:

  • The General Medical Council’s Good Medical Practice recommends doctors refer only to practitioners registered with a statutory regulator OR on one of the Accredited Registers such as Treatments You Can Trust www.treatmentsyoucantrust.org.uk
  • All practitioners on the Treatments you can Trust register chose to join the Accredited Register, demonstrating their commitment to high standards and public protection.
  • GPs and other health care professionals who want to refer a patient for an injectable cosmetic can choose a practitioner on the Treatments you can Trust Register knowing they meet certain standards. The Accredited Registers programme gives confidence, choice, quality and protection. 


For Registered Nurses

 

nmc logo

Important changes to the Nursing and Midwifery Council’s (NMC) fitness to practise process.

Under our current fitness to practise rules, NMC has to take every case to answer to a full hearing regardless of how serious it is.

These changes will mean that NMC case examiners will have new powers to issue warnings,

  • agree undertakings and
  • give advice

allowing NMC to conclude less serious cases without the need to progress to a full hearing.

The changes will help to ensure NMC reach the outcome that best protects the public at the earliest opportunity in every case.

Where undertakings are agreed with a nurse or midwife, this will involve putting in place agreed measures, such as additional training, to address areas of practice which cause a current clinical risk to patients.

You can find out more about all the changes that are happening on the NMC website.

 

Nurse Prescribing – Competence and Practice

Last year the updated Competency Framework to support healthcare professionals to prescribe effectively was published by the Royal Pharmaceutical Society. Through national updates, practical case studies and extended expert sessions, this conference focuses on demonstrating and improving nurse prescribing competence and practice – embedding the competency framework, and ten competency dimensions for all nurse prescribers.

For more information:

nursing event

 

For Managers

 

Data Protection

There is change in the law to be brought about by the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). The GDPR becomes directly applicable in UK law (while we remain a member of the EU) on 25 May 2018.

On 7 August the Government set out further details of the forthcoming (UK) Data Protection Bill:

It will repeal the UK’s existing Data Protection Act 1998, implement another piece of EU legislation, the Data Protection Law Enforcement Directive (DPLED), bring our data protection law up to date and prepare UK for life outside the EU.

Information Commissioners Office

Most of us are registered with the Information Commissioners Office (ICO).  Guidance on the change can be found at:

 

Cyber Security

Given recent concerns about cyber security, you may be interested to know that the Government’s The National Cyber Security Centre publishes ‘10 Steps to Cyber Security’.  The Executive summary, from which detailed guidance can be accessed, is at:

Review of professional regulation and registration published by Professional Standards Authority

professional standards authority logo

This is the body which oversees the activities of nine regulators:

  • General Chiropractic Council
  • General Dental Council
  • General Medical Council
  • General Optical Council
  • General Osteopathic Council
  • Health & Care Professions Council
  • Nursing & Midwifery Council
  • General Pharmaceutical Council
  • Pharmaceutical Society of Northern Ireland.

The report also spotlights accredited registers and the opportunities it offers to a stretched national health and care service, but argues that more government backing is needed to make sure members of public look out for its quality mark to help them access safer practitioners.

Harry Cayton, chief executive of the Professional Standards Authority said:

“Professional regulation is at a critical juncture. It needs to modernise to be able to protect the public today and in the future and to do so we need new law.”

Read the full report:

Treatments You Can Trust Register is an Accredited Register under the PSA accredited registers programme.

 

Marketing assistance from Professional Standards Authority

www.checkapractitioner.com

Practitioners on the Treatments you can Trust Register enjoy the professional and business advantages of belonging to an Accredited Register.

We at Treatments You Can Trust can offer you assistance in your marketing by endorsing, in various ways, your practitioners’ claim to trustworthiness.  In the current unregulated market, we think this offer is worth your attention.  Contact us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to discuss the help we can give you. A recent general endorsement of practitioners on the register from us follows.  You are welcome to use it in your marketing to GPs, Commissioners, dentists and cosmetic clinics.

QAM and PSA logos vertical green 250The Treatments You Can Trust Register is one of 23 registers on the Accredited Registers programme and is designed to assure the public of the quality of practitioners of injectable cosmetic treatments who use prescription only medicines.

The Accredited Registers programme is a Department of Health backed programme which sets standards for practitioners whose roles are not regulated by law. It is recognised by NHS Employers, NHS Choices, the Care Quality Commission and Any Qualified Providers scheme

It is managed and run, independently, by the Professional Standards Authority for Health and Social Care (the Authority). The Authority also oversees the nine statutory regulators such as the General Medical Council; their main purpose is to protect the public by raising regulatory standards in health and care.

Why is it important?

The General Medical Council’s Good Medical Practice recommends doctors refer only to practitioners registered with a statutory regulator OR on one of the Accredited Registers such as Treatments You Can Trust www.treatmentsyoucantrust.org.uk 

All practitioners on the Treatments You Can Trust register chose to join the Accredited Register, demonstrating their commitment to high standards and public protection.

GPs and other health care professionals who want to refer a patient for an injectable cosmetic can choose a practitioner on the Treatments You Can Trust Register knowing they meet certain standards. The Accredited Registers programme gives confidence, choice, quality and protection.

It is not just for healthcare professionals practising injectable cosmetics

The Accredited Registers programme covers a wide range of health and social care occupations. To find out more - visit www.checkapractitioner.com

 

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tyct newsletter thumbThis newsletter is also available in PDF format.

 

 

Quality Assurance

Become a registered provider to display the Quality Assurance Mark in your promotional literature.

“The sign of safer
cosmetic injectable treatments”

Treatments You Can Trust accredited Quality Assurance Mark